Day 3 ~ Ancient History Under Lake Huron Comes Alive

July 27, 2009

53.4 Meters: the depth we dropped anchor today in search of a prize greater than oligochaetes or plankton. According to Guy Meadows, PhD. Director of the Marine Hydrodynamics Laboratories at the University of Michigan, who joined us today, the ridge that cuts through the lake may have been home to hunter-gatherers over 10,000 years ago. The Alpena-Amberly Ridge, once a causeway that connected Michigan to Ontario, is nearly 100 miles long and about forty miles east of Thunder Bay.

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New high resolution bathymetry and progess in 3D modeling makes it possible for Dr. Meadows and his team to revisit this ancient community. Evidence of these early settlers is buried in the sediment and rocks covered with mussels and algae that line the lake. Using state of the art technology, surface towed side scan sonar and a remote operated vehicle (ROV), Dr. Meadows took us on a power point tour of the world below.Inukshuk(s)

The waves were too high to set the ROV in, so our Lake Guardian techies set up the surface towed scanner.

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After two attempts at using the scanner, our system went down, and we had to be satisfied with Professor Meadow’s photos. True to scientific inquiry, we were patient, disappointed and ready to look at this from another angle. We turned to the PONAR grab and abox core to investigate the ridge.

What a treat to find some fantastic samples of clay pieces in our sediment. The vertical samples were perfect and showed the layers found in this ancient ridge.

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Log onto some of these websites to see more articles about Dr. Meadows’ work at the bottom of Lake Huron.

www.nytimes.com/2009/06/23/science/230blake

www.jsonline.com/news/Ancient hunting site may rest under Lake Huron

www.freep.com/2009/07/05/Signs of Human Settlers

Pick your favorite quote for one of today’s photos.

a.]”I bleed for science…”
b.] “Science is in my blood…”
c.] “We eat, live, breathe, sleep and bleed science…”
d.] “Science never sleeps…”
e.] “We’re hurting to do science…” OR
f.] “I am a nerd…”

Eating - Thanks to Carl and Donna, we never are hungry!

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Research Inquiry Aboard the Vessel

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Even UW’s Bucky is deep into inquiry aboard the Lake Guardian.

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Win A Free Flea-How Many Water Fleas in this Catch?

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Will the Real Lobster Gumby Please Sit Down…

Quote of the Day: “Hunting caribou can be done with a baseball bat,” advised Professor Meadows.

Editor’s Note: In regards to the misspelling of the bathymetry in the first edition of this blog post, we have come up with the new technology of a Barfometer. As of today, it has yet to be used. We invite you to submit your owns designs for this device to the blog team. The winner will receive a well traveled pair of socks—courtesy of David.

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post by rosanne, from Lake Huron Exploration WorkshopComments (0)

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