Shipboard and Shoreline Science on Lake Erie

June 18 – 24, 2006


COSEE Great Lakes proudly announces a summer workshop made possible by the Great Lakes National Program Office of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. A one-week cruise on Lake Erie aboard the R/V Lake Guardian will involve teachers and informal educators in interdisciplinary learning opportunities for Great Lakes and ocean systems research.

When

June 18-24, 2006. Full day programs of teaching and learning on the water will end most evenings at anchor in Lake Erie ports. Onshore experiences at the ports will enhance shipboard studies and facilitate interactions with local habitats, teachers and media.

Where

Departure and return port will be Cleveland, Ohio. Cruise stations from Detroit, MI, to Erie, PA, have been selected for teaching and data collection potential. Stations will include opportunities to study…

  • Shipping activities and cargo (Detroit River, Huron Port Authority, and Cuyahoga River
  • Field station research (Stone Laboratory and Regional Science Consortium)
  • Urban shorelines (Detroit, Toledo, Cleveland)
  • Coastal processes and erosion (Huron, Painesville, Erie)
  • DO, conductivity, temperature (Western, Central and Eastern Basins)
  • Plankton and benthos (Western, Central and Eastern Basins)
  • Water levels, currents, stratification (all stations)

Accomodations

Participants will have room and board in the Crew’s quarters of the vessel, 2 berths per room with small space for gear. Wireless internet is available on board.

Support

COSEE Great Lakes will provide stipends, plus meals and instructional materials, for teacher participants. GLNPO waives the cost of rooms for COSEE participants. Application forms will include information on sites and departure port. Graduate credit is available at NAT RES 611: Great Lakes Education Workshop, through Stone Laboratory at The Ohio State University.

Who

Educators

Up to 15 teachers of grades 4-10 or informal educators will be selected for participation. Application forms will be available at this site in early February.

Research scientists accompanying the cruise include…


COSEE Great Lakes Educators coordinating the daily program will be…

Anne Danielski, Coastal Education and Maritime Specialist, Pennsylvania Sea Grant, Penn State University. BS, Biology
Developed & directs Environmental Rediscoveries program; coordinates coastal curriculum devel. Governor’s award for Environmental Excellence in 2002. Coordinated Area of Concern update for Presque Isle.
Helen Domske, Senior Education Specialist, New York Sea Grant (Cornell University faculty); Assoc Dir of Great Lakes Program, SUNY- Buffalo. MS, Education.
Science expertise in alien species, avian botulism, coral reef ecology. Aquarium educator for 15 years. Over 25 years of marine/aquatic teacher ed and curriculum development; teaches UG course in Great Lakes Ecology and graduate course for teachers on Tropical Marine Ecology.
Rosanne Fortner, Professor Emeritus, The Ohio State University, Ohio Sea Grant Educ Coordinator. EdD Sci Ed
Past president NMEA. Middle school science teacher (6 yr). Teacher education and Science educ research (27 yr); author of 12 books of curriculum on Great Lakes and Earth systems topics. Earth Systems and biology background.
Lauren Makeyenko, Environmental Educator, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation
Workshop facilitator for Project WET, Project WILD, Aquatic WILD, Flying WILD, and WOW!: The Wonders of Wetlands. Curriculum development and implementation of multi-disciplinary programs at Buffalo Museum of Science; teaches UG course in Great Lakes Ecology.

Participating Scientist Bios

Jacqueline Adams is a research scientist positioned at the U.S. EPA Great Lakes National Program Office (GLNPO) through the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education. She has a B.S. degree in Chemistry and Biology from Ripon College. Her research interests include effects of induced stresses on benthic invertebrates, Great Lakes water quality, and ecosystem monitoring. Jackie works aboard the R/V Lake Guardian for both the spring and summer GLNPO Open Lake Water Quality Surveys. Currently, she is in the process developing a suite of surface water indicators as well as helping to plan the 2006 State of the Lakes Ecosystem Conference (SOLEC).

William J. Edwards is an Assistant Professor of Biology at Niagara University in Lewiston, NY, and the Associate Director, Niagara Environmental Leadership Institute, a new USEPA supported program involved in community outreach, research, and education. He has recent experience aboard the Lake Guardian in physical and chemical limnology as a post-doctoral researcher as part of the USEPA Lake Erie Trophic Dynamics Study in 2002. There his research focused on the interactions of physical water movements, invasive species (the zebra mussel) and eutrophication on the Lake Erie “Dead Zone” (hypolimnetic anoxia). Dr. Edwards’ areas of specialization include physical limnology, plankton ecology, invasive species, and toxicology. His current research interests include the Lake Erie hypoxia problem, zebra mussel excretion and links to eutrophication, and bioaccumulation of toxics in Lake Ontario food webs.

Elizabeth (Beth) Hinchey Malloy is Ilinois-Indiana Sea Grant’s Great Lakes Ecosystem Specialist, working in the U.S. EPA Great Lakes National Program Office. Beth was formerly a research ecologist and post-doctoral fellow at the U.S. EPA Atlantic Ecology Division in Narragansett, RI. She has an M.S. and Ph.D. in Marine Science from the College of William & Mary, Virginia Institute of Marine Science, and a B.S. in Biological Sciences from the University of Notre Dame. Her research interests include organism-sediment interactions, fish and shellfish-habitat relationships, and sediment geochemistry. She works on Great Lakes issues that include ecosystem monitoring, wetland habitats, sediment removal, pollution prevention, and pollutant mass balance issues relating to policy.

Lawrence (Larry) Krissek is an Associate Professor and Vice-Chair in the Department of Geological Sciences at Ohio State University. His educational background is in geological oceanography, with a B.S. from the University of Washington and a Ph.D. from Oregon State University. His primary research focus is on sedimentary records of climate and environmental change, with specific studies examining: 1) the history of glacial fluctuations in the Northern Hemisphere during the past 3 million years; and 2) the history and causes of climate change in Antarctica during the past 40 million years. He also has an ongoing research interest in the effects of land use practices on the patterns and rates of soil erosion and sediment deposition in lakes and reservoirs. He collaborates with faculty from OSU’s College of Education in the development and use of more effective teaching resources and teaching practices in earth science education, and has been teaching earth science content courses for educators through OSU’s F.T. Stone Lab program for the past 12 years.

Bob Wellington is an aquatic biologist with over 30 years experience working on Presque Isle Bay and Lake Erie issues. A lifelong resident of the Erie, PA, area, he bought his own rowboat at age 14, and kept it on Presque Isle Bay. He obtained a Bachelors of Science in Zoology from the Pennsylvania State University, and a Masters of Arts in Teaching from the University of Alaska in Fairbanks. He worked as a Water Pollution Control Specialist for the Pennsylvania Department of Health, a Fisheries Biologist with the Pennsylvania Fish Commission, and an Aquatic Biologist with the Erie County Department of Health. Bob has been an adult leader for the Boy Scouts of America for over 10 years, and helps scouts with Fishing and Environmental Science Merit badges. He is on the National Registry of Environmental Professionals. A recent retiree, he currently serves an adjunct professor with Gannon University.

Gregory L. Boyer is a Professor of Chemistry at SUNY-ESF in Syracuse. His research interests focus on the biochemical interactions of trace metals with plants and algae. Iron has been shown to be a limiting nutrient for growth in many ecosystems. To overcome this, microorganisms, algae, and higher plants produce potent metal binding compounds (termed siderophores) to aid in iron uptake and prevent their competitors from obtaining the needed element. He is currently studying the chemical nature of these siderophores, as well as the biochemical mechanisms controlling their uptake and production. This information is being applied to the natural environment, where the importance of these compounds is being evaluated in terrestrial, freshwater and marine ecosystems.

In addition to his studies on iron, Dr. Boyer is working on harmful algal blooms that occur in both freshwater and marine ecosystems. This includes the toxic red tides that occur along the North Atlantic coast, brown tides that occur off Long Island, and toxic blue-green algae that can be found in freshwaters ponds and lakes throughout the world. Dr. Boyer runs an analytical facility for the study of algal toxins at ESF and is actively developing monitoring methods for the toxins in the Great Lakes.

Beth Hinchey Malloy is Ilinois-Indiana Sea Grant’s Great Lakes Ecosystem Specialist, working in the U.S. EPA Great Lakes National Program Office. Beth was formerly a research ecologist and post-doctoral fellow at the U.S. EPA Atlantic Ecology Division in Narragansett, RI. She has an M.S. and Ph.D. in Marine Science from the College of William & Mary, Virginia Institute of Marine Science, and a B.S. in Biological Sciences from the University of Notre Dame. Her research interests include organism-sediment interactions, fish and shellfish-habitat relationships, and sediment geochemistry. She works on Great Lakes issues that include ecosystem monitoring, wetland habitats, sediment removal, pollution prevention, and pollutant mass balance issues relating to policy.

Susan E. Boehme received her undergraduate degree in Geology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and her Masters and Ph.D. in Chemical Oceanography from North Carolina State University. Her graduate research focused on the biologically-mediated chemical transformations occurring in coastal marine sediments. During her postdoctoral work at Rutgers University (New Brunswick, NJ) and at the Max-Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology (Bremen, Germany) she continued her investigations of sediment chemistry in shallow to deep sediments globally. Her work also included studies of sea surface-atmospheric exchange of CO2, water column distributions of nutrients and chemical constituents, and development of new instrumentation for in-situ measurements. Throughout her studies and postdoctoral work she taught classes and gave presentations locally and at national and international meetings. Susan’s desire to bring a scientific perspective to public policy led her to the New York Academy of Sciences where she became the Director of the New York/New Jersey Harbor Project. Susan is currently an Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant Extension Specialist with the Great Lakes Legacy Program. She works with communities and EPA staff around the Great Lakes region to remove contaminated sediments from various waterbodies in an effort to improve environmental and human health.

Jacqueline Adams is a research scientist positioned at the U.S. EPA Great Lakes National Program Office (GLNPO) through the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education. She has a B.S. degree in Chemistry and Biology from Ripon College. Her research interests include effects of induced stresses on benthic invertebrates, Great Lakes water quality, and ecosystem monitoring. Jackie works aboard the R/V Lake Guardian for both the spring and summer GLNPO Open Lake Water Quality Surveys. Currently, she is in the process developing a suite of surface water indicators as well as helping to plan the 2006 State of the Lakes Ecosystem Conference.

For updates and further information, contact Anne Danielski or Rosanne Fortner

For Scientists:

Let COSEE help in engaging educational outreach
 

Events by Date:

November 9 – 10, 2012
EDUCATOR WORKSHOP: Inspire Great Lakes Stewardship! Help Your Students Protect their Watershed
July 8 – 14, 2012
Shipboard and Shoreline Science Workshop Aboard the R/V Lake Guardian
June 11 – 12, 2012
Science and Stories of the St. Louis River Estuary: Exploring Technology for Teaching About the St. Louis River
July 25 – 30, 2010
Lake Ontario Exploration Workshop
July 6 – 12, 2010
Shipboard and Shoreline Science on Lake Michigan
R/V Lake Guardian
October 14, 2009
Lake Erie Teacher Workshop
Tifft Nature Preserve, Buffalo, NY
August 26, 2009
Exploring the Link between Invasive Species & the Erie Canal
Spencerport, NY
July 25 – 31, 2009
Shipboard and Shoreline Science on Lake Huron
R/V Lake Guardian
July 18 – 24, 2009
Lake Erie Exploration Workshop
July 7 – 13, 2009
Shipboard and Shoreline Science on Lake Superior
R/V Lake Guardian
February 16 – 27, 2009
Great Lakes ALIVE
On-line workshop through the College of Exploration

« past events